Category Archives: U.S. History

Okanagan, Oroville, and Omak

Old farm building in the hill country outside Oroville, Wash.

Old farm building in the hill country outside Oroville, Wash.

Wine country near Osoyoos, BC.

Wine country near Osoyoos, BC.

The Similkameen River flows through lower central BC.

The Similkameen River flows through lower central BC.

Water is everything in the hot, dry ranch country of central Washington.

Water is everything in the hot, dry ranch country of central Washington.

Farm near Omak, Wash.

Farm near Omak, Wash.

One of nearly two dozen rodeo princesses at the Omak Stampede.

One of nearly two dozen rodeo princesses at the Omak Stampede.

Old farm equipment now entertains tourists in Molson, Wash.

Old farm equipment now entertains tourists in Molson, Wash.

Abandoned farm and home near Molson, Wash.

Abandoned farm and home near Molson, Wash.

Abandoned farm in north central Washington.

Abandoned farm in north central Washington.

On the road in the high plateau above Oroville, Wash.

On the road in the high plateau above Oroville, Wash.

Osoyoos Lake, Oroville, Wash.

Osoyoos Lake, Oroville, Wash.

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A Few Photos of Native American History

The Utes of Colorado were kicked out of Colorado, except the four corners, and forced to relocated to marginal lands in Utah. Today their lands are called the Uintah-Ouray Reservation.

The Utes of Colorado were kicked out of Colorado, except the four corners, and forced to relocated to marginal lands in Utah. Today their lands are called the Uintah and Ouray Reservation, in  Duchesne County, Utah.

 

I began my 2,800 mile journey from St. Louis to Seattle (May 23-27) by visiting the Museum of Westward Expansion, underneath the Gateway Arch. Giant wall-size images of famous Indian chiefs wearing "Great White Father" medallions are on display. The display is quite powerful if one knows the history behind their respective peoples.

I began my 2,800 mile journey from St. Louis to Seattle (May 23-27) by visiting the Museum of Westward Expansion, underneath the Gateway Arch. Giant wall-size images of famous Indian chiefs wearing “Great White Father” medallions are on display. The display is quite powerful if one knows the history behind their respective peoples.

Near Meeker Colorado, a nearly 90-year marker celebrates the site where Indian agent Nathan Meeker and colleagues were killed. A more nuanced description of the incidents can be found in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee; Meeker had called in the U.S. Cavalry triggering fears of a massacre prior to the fight.Near Meeker, Colo., a nearly 90-year marker celebrates the site where Indian agent Nathan Meeker and colleagues were killed. A more nuanced description of the incidents can be found in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee; Meeker had called in the U.S. Cavalry triggering fears of a massacre prior to the fight.

Colorado's political and economic interests promoted cleansing the territory of the Utes to promote mining, ranching, and other enterprises in the 1870s. The Meeker area, seen here, was one of the last they held. The map seen on the interpretive sign, barely visible, shows the erosion of their lands during the settling of the region by mostly white Americans.

Colorado’s political and economic interests promoted cleansing the territory of the Utes to promote mining, ranching, and other enterprises in the 1870s. The Meeker area, seen here, was one of the last they held. The map seen on the interpretive sign, barely visible, shows the erosion of their lands during the settling of the region by mostly white Americans.

The Kansa Indians of Kansas are photographed here in a photo on display at the Kaw Mission Museum in Council Grove, Kansas.

The Kaw Indians of Kansas are photographed here in a photo on display at the Kaw Mission Museum in Council Grove, Kansas. Go to www.kawmission.org for more details. There are different accounts regarding the use of “Kansa” for Kaw people.

Historic photos of Kansa Indians are on display at the Kaw Indian Mission in Council Grove, Kansas.

Historic photos of Kaw Indians are on display at the Kaw Indian Mission in Council Grove, Kansas.

The Kaw Indian Mission in Council Grove has a wonderful collection of artifacts and information about Kansas' Native peoples. Their land was taken in the 1800s and they were sent to facilities like this to "take the Indian" out of them, according to historic accounts. It's worth a stop.

The Kaw Mission Historic Site in Council Grove has a wonderful collection of artifacts and information about Kansas’ Native peoples. Their land was taken in the 1800s and they were sent to facilities like this (buildings not seen here) to “take the Indian” out of them, according to historic accounts. It’s worth a stop.

The Friends of Kaw Heritage erected this statue in Council Grove, Kansas, called Guardian of the Grove, by sculptor Thomas Mark Sampsel. The sculpture highlights authentic garments and dressing styles of the Kansa people.

The Friends of Kaw Heritage erected this statue in Council Grove, Kansas, called Guardian of the Grove, by sculptor Thomas Mark Sampsel. The sculpture highlights authentic garments and dressing styles of the Kaw people.

The Shawnee Mission, in Kansas City, Kansas, is one of several missionaries opened in the 1800s to "civilize" the native peoples of Kansas.

The Shawnee Mission, in Kansas City, Kansas, is one of several missionaries opened in the 1800s to “civilize” the native peoples of Kansas.

The Shawnee Mission of Kansas City, Kansas, features three historic structures where Native children were taught trades and purged of their Native customs.

The Shawnee Mission of Kansas City, Kansas, features three historic structures where Native children were taught trades and purged of their Native customs.

 

The so-called Graham Cave (Native name unknown) has evidence of use at least 10,000 years old.
The so-called Graham Cave (Native name unknown), about one hour west of St. Louis, Mo., has evidence of use at least 10,000 years old.
The Klamath, Modoc, and Yahooskin peoples make up the Klamath Tribe. Today they own precious little of their historic lands. A history of the Modoc War can be found in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

The Klamath, Modoc, and Yahooskin peoples make up the Klamath Tribe. Today they own precious little of their historic lands. A history of the Modoc War can be found in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

 

 

 

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